Archive | July 2021

An Expedition for Thursday Doors

walking walking
looking for doors looking
for ways to connect
one with another–
walking and looking
for the one door that becomes the center,
the pivot that marks where I turn around

walking walking
should I retrace my path?
or sit for awhile
and consider how
I came to be here,
thinking of all the doors I haven’t seen–
they are not lost—just waiting to be found

I photographed this mansion on Riverside Drive awhile ago, but my front views were not very good, so I made a special trip back to photograph the front again.

You can’t get close to the front, but the side, on West 89th Street, is very accessible–you can even drive into the doorway.

Built by Isaac Rice, an attorney and investor, in the early 1900s, in 1907 it was sold to cigarette manufacturer Solomon Schinasi, and then to a Yeshiva in 1954. There was a huge battle in 1980 over whether it should be landmarked or sold to a developer who would have knocked it down and built another highrise–Landmarks won out, and it remains a cash-strapped school.

My poem, for Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday theme expedition, provided by Donna Matthews, is a duodora. You can read about the form here.

Read more about the Rice Mansion here and here.

And see more Thursday Doors here. Although Dan is on vacation this week, there are lots of previous posts to peruse.

Some Duds

I have a few of these paintings going at the same time. Here are a few that just never seemed to come together.

This has good colors but just never came together for me.

A landscape that just doesn’t cut it. I gave up on it a while ago.

Pieces from the proverbial cutting room floor. The previous three are sadly destined to be cut up and used elsewhere. Oh well, life goes on. Have a great week! Nina

A Visit to the Met

My friend had morning tickets to the Alice Neel show at the Met and invited me. I haven’t been to New York City since Kerfe’s birthday in January 2020. The city seemed the same but different. All the restaurants had these outdoor areas gussied up with plants. I wouldn’t like to eat in one because if someone walked by smoking a cigarette I’d lose my appetite.

I’d seen an Alice Neel show with Kerfe a few years ago and I remember it as mostly portraits. This show was a retrospective and had a lot of pieces I liked so I thought I’d show you. Here were some of my favorites:

Sorry I didn’t write down the titles. I also didn’t photograph her drawings which I liked a lot.

This last drawing was done by Neel when she was in a mental hospital for a year. She had a very intense life which showed in all her work but especially this drawing:

I should have photographed some of the portraits which made up her main body of work. Her expressiveness and technique inspired me and I’d like to do some larger paintings one of these days.

I

The Anthropocene Hymnal

The Anthropocene Hymnal: Songs of a self-defining era by [Ingrid Wilson]

I’m pleased to be part of Ingrid Wilson’s project, The Anthropocene Hymnal: Songs of a self-defining era, “A poetic response to the joint crises of climate change and biodiversity loss. Featuring the work of internationally-renowned and bestselling poets including Gabriela Marie Milton, Ivor Steven and Sherry Marr. Voices from five continents join in song to protest the damage we are doing to our only home, planet earth: these ‘songs of a self-defining era’ are the poems which comprise The Anthropocene Hymnal”.

Some of my poems are included, and that’s my collage on the cover.

Available on Amazon in both print and kindle versions, and read Ingrid’s post for information on obtaining a PDF copy. All profits will be donated to the WWF.

Thursday Doors: House on West End Avenue

I’ve always liked this house on West End Ave. The entrance is on the side.

I couldn’t get a straight on angle to photo the door. It has nice details on the top and in the surrounding arch.

And here’s some flowers I saw while walking along Columbus Avenue.

You can see more doors and join in here.

The Kick-About #32 ‘Low Dense’

A symphony of color and form this week.

Red's Kingdom


From the previous Kick-About’s deep and velvety shadows, courtesy of animator of silhouettes, Lotte Reiniger, to this Cinemascopic vista of glowing, saturated colours by the painter, Brian Rutenberg, and all the new work Low Dense has inspired in the same short space of fourteen days. Enjoy the view.


Graeme Daly

“When I was an ambassador for University one hot summer, similar to the melting heat in the UK at the moment, I was tasked with taking down the graduate shows of the students that proudly presented their creative work to their family, friends and fellow students. I spent a few weeks dismantling the makeshift wooden stages, pulling out nails and painting over the brightly coloured stripes and symbols that students designed to present their work in theme with their creations.

One task I had to do was take large canvases students had painted on, and throw them into…

View original post 2,266 more words

Weekend Work 7/19/2021

I worked this weekend on a few I had started. That is the best way for me as I wait for it to dry and then look/paint again.

I actually took some photos of this one as it progressed. Here was one stage:

It seemed kind of flat so I cut into it to expose more black. It was an improvement perhaps.

I added the white lines at the end.

I have a few other paintings started and will post later this week. Have a great week. Nina

Serendipity (Thursday Doors and more)

some call the city a jungle,
tangled chaos–
but shapes
form
patterns—all those
untried
doors!
endless portals,
sprouting
more

I do like arched doors, and here are a few I saw on my travels around NYC last week. The one above and below were on opposite ends of the same block.

a close up

I’ve written a zeno poem for Colleen’s #TankaTuesday with synonyms for green and morass. We can now use any form from the poet’s collective list.

Here’s an arched side door next to some scaffolding, ubiquitous in Manhattan.

And some greenery and hydrangeas from the city parks–we are still getting a lot of rain.

My younger daughter used to play softball on this field in Central Park. It was a foggy day, and the fields were closed on account of being so wet. hence the red flag.

You can see more and join in here for Thursday Doors.

From The Archives

I’ve been messing around with a few paintings but nothing is finished. I thought I’d post a few very old things done years ago. I used to do a lot of tissue paper on glass; I once did a window in my parents’ friends house. I wonder if it’s still there?

This is one of the oldest things I have. For context Johnson/Humphrey ran for office in 1964. That’s one of the signs on this wall in New York City. Also Hello Dolly was on Broadway.

Interesting to look back on these old pieces and I’m glad I still have them. Have a good week! Nina

Galah Cockatoo (draw a bird day)

galah–
colorful clowns,
a loud mouthed gathering
of white crested coral–
life indwelling
wild, full

A Badger’s hexastitch for Colleen’s #TankaTuesday and Draw a Bird Day.

Galah cockatoos are native to Australia, where they live in large flocks on open grasslands feeding on seeds, berries and insects. But they also can be seen in urban settings, where their raucous calls and adaptations to human habitation are often considered nuisances. The word galah means fool or clown in the Aboriginal language of Yuwaalaraay and is used as such as a derogatory term in Australia (or so the internet tells me…any Australians reading this can confirm or deny)

Cockatoos are highly social and intelligent, and are bred and sold as pets. But these very traits make them not only very high maintenance, but possibly destructive and dangerous. I’ve written about this before–these animals should not be confined and separated from the flocks that are their natural social groups.