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We all look through windows surrounded by the sea (for Howard Hodgkin)

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Equal to
the task:  a gesture,
the texture
of brushstrokes,
a conversation beyond
white.  Abstractions act

as ruses,
memories summoned
into light.
Dig deeply
into the familiar and
hold it close.  Timeless.

Image result for howard hodgkin for matisse

I wanted to acknowledge the great Howard Hodgkin, who died this week at age 84.  My collage is an homage to his painting, above, “For Matisse”.  His work often evokes windows, a subject Matisse was fond of as well.

The poem uses the secret keeper’s words for this week.

Tribal deer skull

I like to pretend I’m a member of a tribe when I paint a skull. I imagine it’s going to be used for a ceremony. This is one of the deer skulls I got last week: a wonderful specimen, probably a pretty young buck with developing antlers. 

Here is a view with the antlers and my messy bedroom in the photo. 

At the Hawk’s Well

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In 1916, W. B. Yeats wrote a dance play, “At the Hawk’s Well”, inspired by Japanese Noh theatre (to which he had been introduced by Ezra Pound) and Irish folklore.

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The Japan Society recently had an exhibit of UK artist Simon Starling’s commemoration of the 100th anniversary of Yeats’ work, along with some of the art that inspired both him and Yeats.

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I watched the beautiful video of the hawk dancing several times

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and then I drew masks until my hand cramped up and my legs hurt from standing.

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When I looked at the drawings, it struck me how humans have always struggled to understand and live their lives well.  We are united in both sorrow and dignity, all cultures, throughout history, all over the earth.

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A New Batch

One thing I use and sell art-wise are my greeting cards. My supply was running low so I got the assembly line going: cut up the painting, rubber cement onto the blank cards, leave under a brick for a while and then draw some more on the image and outline. It’s very relaxing. 

Baltimore Museum of Art

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Yesterday I took the train to Baltimore to see the Matisse/Diebenkorn exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art.  Wow!  but no photos allowed, so I’ll talk a bit about it at the end of the post.  But…the Cone Collection!  I had totally forgotten it was there too. The Gauguin cellist, above, stopped me in my tracks.

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The Cone sisters amassed an amazing collection of early 20th century art.  Plenty of Matisse, like the figures and dancer above.

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I loved this tiny Renoir landscape.

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And I had never seen this Van Gogh landscape either.  The brush strokes are almost like stitching.

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The museum also has many other rooms of modern art, and the painted wood relief sculptures above, by Gertrude Greene and Burgoyne Diller, reminded me of something Nina would do.

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I’m keeping in mind this portrait by Max Beckmann for my self-portrait series.

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There are also smaller collections of European and African and Asian art.  I thought this mask from Angola complemented Raphael’s luminous and also enigmatic painting.

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But my very favorite item outside the Matisse/Diebenkorn exhibit was this cabinet decorated with reverse painted glass by Richard Lee.

I was introduced to Richard Diebenkorn by Nina in 1976 when he had a retrospective at the Whitney (she was working there at the time).  You can see a selection of the work on view now in Baltimore on the website, here, but as is true with any artist that works large scale, a reproduction can’t even begin to give the experience of the actual work.  Matisse was an inspiration to Diebenkorn throughout his painting life, and the juxtapositions of the works makes that clear.  Both artists:  just wow.

Two abstract paintings sit side by side.

There are plenty of figural drawings, too, and one common element was the reworking of the page in a way that layered all the different lines of the different attempts.  An example of Matisse’s work is below, a reminder that even great artists do not achieve satisfaction or perfection even after many lines have been drawn.  They just keep working to get there.

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Landscapes

I wanted to use every color available on the ArtSet app for iPad and it was fun. After I finished and snapped a screen shot I used the app where you can smush the paint. I almost like the second (smushed) one better. 

This app is really fun. Highly recommend it. 

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Two sketches from the Art Set app (deluxe) for iPad. 

When in doubt do a grid. 

From a seed redux 

Kerfe and I haven’t posted in a while and we decided that today would be a good day to return. My life has been topsy turvy since my husband had a stroke in August. 

Kerfe and I did a show a while back. It was an Art Walk in my town. We were pretty well received. I wound up falling in love with Kerfe’s piece “Black Barbie” and bought it. It’s the large collage in the center of the first picture. 

We have missed everyone and we hope to get back to regular posting. 

Unhidden: the art of Ronald Lockett

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“I feel like every time I make a piece of artwork I express myself strongly so that a person can feel something.”
–Ronald Lockett

honest layers that
witness hurt, test memory,
note the silences
of secrets, now unhidden
with forgiveness and regret

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Ronald Lockett’s “Trapped” series records the complex relations between humans and the living world.  How do we treat animals?  the environment? each other?

I managed to visit the retrospective of Lockett’s found art last week at the Museum of American Folk Art, right before it closed.  These are powerful works.

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Lockett felt the world deeply, as the works from his Oklahoma City bombing series, above, show.  “You try to be honest about what you are trying to say,” he said about them.  He acknowledged his debt to quilts in their construction.

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His responses to the homeless

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and the holocaust

are reminders that the importance of bearing witness has no time frame.

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Lockett also made many tributes to those he knew and admired.  Above, a work honoring Jesse Owens, intricately formed in tin.

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He painted “Instinct for Survival” when his brother went missing in the Gulf War.

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And his tin tributes to his great aunt Sarah Lockett, the woman that raised both him and his cousin, the artist Thornton Dial, reflect both her love of gardening, and her quilts.

Ronald Lockett died in 1998 at age 32 from AIDS-related pneumonia.

You can read more about him here.

My poem uses the secret keeper’s words this week
WIT – HURT – NOTE – HONEST – TEST

Found in the garage…

…because what better way to spend the weekend than cleaning out the garage? Actually I will need a dumpster for that task. Husband is inside going through boxes of old papers, one by one. It is a sad sight (I’d just dump them but he can’t). 

This is a photo taken by my father of me painting a large landscape for the window of a store. It was painted on some kind of fabric as I recall. I didn’t have the heart to toss it so I’m making it immortal as part of this blog.