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Woven 2

This time I cut a painting on the paper cutter inadvertently leaving the first strip attached at the edge. This kept the original image somewhat together. 

It also made it easier to weave and to get a tighter weave. Here it is finished. 

I stuck the little squares I cut off down the sides. It’s not glued down though. I did glue down the first one on black painted watercolor paper. 

Here’s a closeup of the second one. This was the abstract I posted last week. 

I am thinking of doing some very small weavings for my greeting card supply. 

Woven

The abstract from the other day: I cut it into strips and wove it. It reminded me of those loopy pot holders we used to make on the little metal frame. Those were fun! Anyone out there remember making pot holders for their mothers?

This was a good way to improve an ugly painting and I kind of like it. Here’s a closeup with it on black paper. 

Also a close up on white. The black is better I think. 

Montclair Art Museum

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As Nina said in her post, the “Matisse and American Art” exhibit did not allow photography…but if you are in the area, you should definitely take the time to go and see it.  There are many wonderful works by both Matisse and artists who have paid homage to his work.

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One piece that attracted me immediately was by Janet Taylor Pickett, and to our delight there was an entire show in the museum based on a series she had done responding to Matisse.  Her creative spirit is definitely kin to mine.

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Other works that delighted:  a Nick Cave soundsuit.

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and several words by master collage artist Romare Bearden.  This one shows Circe and Odysseus.

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Painter George Innes is from Montclair, and has his own room full of mysterious light.

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And the Museum also has a fine collection of Native American art.

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It was fun to visit with Nina and her family, and to celebrate her birthday in the company of Matisse and friends.

Kerfe visits New Jersey!

It was a lovely spring day yesterday and Kerfe took the train in from the city to take me out for my birthday and see a show at the Montclair Museum. 

That photo is me and Kerfe looking at some paintings. They didn’t allow photos of the Matisse show. One of my favorites was an Andy Warhol. I tried doing a drawing and am including an image from the internet. 

The show was about artists influenced by Matisse. There was a wonderful Rothko, a Frankenthaler, Motherwell, all with a nod to the great Henri Matisse. Very inspiring!

Kerfe gave me a beautiful gift. 

An Aries pendant with my birthstone, a diamond!  My new signature piece of jewelry. Thank you Kerfe!

Abstract (splashing paint around)

I haven’t been painting enough. This piece started with three main globs of color and went on from there. Shout out to Davisbrotherlylove whose abstracts inspire me a lot, although his are well thought out and considered while this one is pretty much a mess. Still, it’s a start and I will do some more like this. 

Excited that Kerfe is taking the train to see me today for my birthday (next week). I will show her around and we will go to the Matisse show at the Montclair Museum. I’m trying to decide where to go for lunch. We have 120 restaurants here so it’s hard to decide. I will post our adventures later. 

We all look through windows surrounded by the sea (for Howard Hodgkin)

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Equal to
the task:  a gesture,
the texture
of brushstrokes,
a conversation beyond
white.  Abstractions act

as ruses,
memories summoned
into light.
Dig deeply
into the familiar and
hold it close.  Timeless.

Image result for howard hodgkin for matisse

I wanted to acknowledge the great Howard Hodgkin, who died this week at age 84.  My collage is an homage to his painting, above, “For Matisse”.  His work often evokes windows, a subject Matisse was fond of as well.

The poem uses the secret keeper’s words for this week.

Tribal deer skull

I like to pretend I’m a member of a tribe when I paint a skull. I imagine it’s going to be used for a ceremony. This is one of the deer skulls I got last week: a wonderful specimen, probably a pretty young buck with developing antlers. 

Here is a view with the antlers and my messy bedroom in the photo. 

At the Hawk’s Well

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In 1916, W. B. Yeats wrote a dance play, “At the Hawk’s Well”, inspired by Japanese Noh theatre (to which he had been introduced by Ezra Pound) and Irish folklore.

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The Japan Society recently had an exhibit of UK artist Simon Starling’s commemoration of the 100th anniversary of Yeats’ work, along with some of the art that inspired both him and Yeats.

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I watched the beautiful video of the hawk dancing several times

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and then I drew masks until my hand cramped up and my legs hurt from standing.

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When I looked at the drawings, it struck me how humans have always struggled to understand and live their lives well.  We are united in both sorrow and dignity, all cultures, throughout history, all over the earth.

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A New Batch

One thing I use and sell art-wise are my greeting cards. My supply was running low so I got the assembly line going: cut up the painting, rubber cement onto the blank cards, leave under a brick for a while and then draw some more on the image and outline. It’s very relaxing. 

Baltimore Museum of Art

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Yesterday I took the train to Baltimore to see the Matisse/Diebenkorn exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art.  Wow!  but no photos allowed, so I’ll talk a bit about it at the end of the post.  But…the Cone Collection!  I had totally forgotten it was there too. The Gauguin cellist, above, stopped me in my tracks.

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The Cone sisters amassed an amazing collection of early 20th century art.  Plenty of Matisse, like the figures and dancer above.

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I loved this tiny Renoir landscape.

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And I had never seen this Van Gogh landscape either.  The brush strokes are almost like stitching.

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The museum also has many other rooms of modern art, and the painted wood relief sculptures above, by Gertrude Greene and Burgoyne Diller, reminded me of something Nina would do.

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I’m keeping in mind this portrait by Max Beckmann for my self-portrait series.

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There are also smaller collections of European and African and Asian art.  I thought this mask from Angola complemented Raphael’s luminous and also enigmatic painting.

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But my very favorite item outside the Matisse/Diebenkorn exhibit was this cabinet decorated with reverse painted glass by Richard Lee.

I was introduced to Richard Diebenkorn by Nina in 1976 when he had a retrospective at the Whitney (she was working there at the time).  You can see a selection of the work on view now in Baltimore on the website, here, but as is true with any artist that works large scale, a reproduction can’t even begin to give the experience of the actual work.  Matisse was an inspiration to Diebenkorn throughout his painting life, and the juxtapositions of the works makes that clear.  Both artists:  just wow.

Two abstract paintings sit side by side.

There are plenty of figural drawings, too, and one common element was the reworking of the page in a way that layered all the different lines of the different attempts.  An example of Matisse’s work is below, a reminder that even great artists do not achieve satisfaction or perfection even after many lines have been drawn.  They just keep working to get there.

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