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Eagle Owl (draw a bird day)

spread your wings
carry the night in
silent flight

The eagle owl is both one of the largest and longest-lived owls. With wing spans up to 6 feet, it has no natural predators, although it is sometimes mobbed by crows. The leading causes of death– electrocution, hunting, and poisoning–are man-made.

Nesting on cliffs or rocky outcrops, it has a wide distribution throughout Europe and Asia. I love its binomial name–Bubo Bubo.

Eagle owls are solitary, territorial, and nocturnal. They can more often be heard, having a large number of vocalizations, than seen.

For Colleen’s #TankaTuesday, poet’s choice.

Finishing up a few paintings

Actually the two I posted last week. I’ll post them as the before and after just for kicks.

I messed with this one and wound up cutting it out and mounting it on another piece of black paper. It’s pretty wobbly. Even though I weigh these paintings down as I go this one has fabric and heavy painting on it.

The one I showed you last week and how it looks now. I spent a lot of time painting this weekend as well as starting to get my small yard cleaned up. As I’ve mentioned we have a beautiful copper beech tree and I spend many happy hours under it.

Have a good week! Nina

Weekend W.I.P.

I usually don’t post work until it’s finished and this one is not. I started by glueing a piece of Marimekko fabric to the paper and went off from there.

I started another one using the strips of old words from the paper Kerfe gave me.

Here are a couple I finished but didn’t post here yet:

It’s looking more and more like spring. Have a good week. Nina

Weekend Work and March begins

Along with the black paper Kerfe also gave me some paper made of strips of print. I’ve been fooling around with it.

Its hard to see this one in a photo. Here are some closeups:

Here are a few shots of the paper. I found that if you tore it just right you’d get the strips of type out.

I am happy with this one. It has a Basquiat feel, not intentional but I do love him. Kerfe always finds the best stuff to send me; I hope she likes what I did with the paper.

Snow melting a bit here and some little signs of spring. Some, like the little ants in my kitchen, are annoying. I will be glad to see spring flowers and maybe an end in sight to this year long pandemic.

Have a good week! Nina.

Red Knot/Moonbird (Draw a Bird Day)

Birds need no maps of the earth,
no compass to locate the forces
that pull and repel.
Their geography is larger
than what can be painted, written down.
Their landscape is contained inside
their very bones,
invisible roots woven through
the air.

Birds move on currents
of sun sky wind and water–
alert to the pauses,
the imperfections
in the movement of the light.
They hear the world
as it slumbers, as it awakens,
as it waits.
They have no need to build bridges
for crossing over.

Birds don’t need to mark their path,
to provide proof
of their connection to the cosmos
with signs or constructs.
Who they are
is part of their being.
The way is within
the first cell of
the first song of
the first particle of
dust from the first star.

I recently read an article about the red knot B95, nicknamed Moonbird. B95 is a banded bird that was both trapped and photographed through 20 years of migration between the tip of South America, where it winters, and the Arctic, where it summers and breeds, a distance of 9000 miles each way. B95 traveled enough miles to go to the moon and most of the way back–hence, Moonbird.

Considering the fact that one half of juvenile red knots dies during their first year’s mirgration, that is quite an accomplishment.

Red knots are robin-sized shore birds that have greyish feathers during their southern winters, but grow red feathers for the summer layover in the Arctic. As recently as 1995 there were over 150,000 red knots making the north-south-north trip, but half of the adult red knot population died between 2000-2002 due to climate change and human intrusions on their habitat. Of particular concern was the reduction of the horseshoe crab population in the tidal waters of the Delaware Bay, an important last feeding stopover before the final flight to the Arctic. Red knots time their migrations to coincide with the yearly egg-laying of horseshoe crabs, feeding on the eggs laid on the beaches. Horseshoe crabs are important to many other species in the bay as well, and scientists are working to restore this vital component of the ecosystem, which was dying due to overfishing and overdevelopment.

Red knots fly in acrobatic groups and perform evasive movements in unison meant to confuse predators like hawks. How do they “know” where to go? One theory is that they have an internal genetic flight map, but they are also known to respond to the position of the sun and the movements of the stars as they often fly all night. Red knots may also recognize both landmarks and magnetic fields. No wonder they have been called “a flying compass”

Moonbird was last spotted in 2014, 19 years after he was first caught and banded.

Red knots were the first bird ever listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Poem up at the Ekphrastic Review

My poem Upon a Time, inspired by “Spinning Flax”, by Maria Martinetti, below, is posted on The Ekphrastic Review today.

Picture

hushabye, don’t cry–
all the pretty horses fly
shining starborne dreams

You can read the entire poem here.

My thanks once again to editor Lorette C. Luzajic for supporting my work and the interaction between the visual and written arts.

Weekend work 1/25/21

My husband called this “two vortices” but vortices are water. These are meant as tornados.

This is a couple of layers which I’ve been doing lately. The tornado on the right is cut out and pasted. I really can’t explain this painting or where it came from but it was fun and I learned you can never put enough whirling marks in different colors on a tornado.

Have a good week! Nina

renderings

I re-
turn to the earth
reflected as shadow–
silhouette echoing
the places I
have been

For Sue Vincent’s photo prompt, above, in the Badger’s Hexastitch form for Colleen’s #TankaTuesday poet’s choice. I’ve decided to try a new syllabic form each month.

Happy to have Sue’s photos back as inspiration!

Weekend work 1/18/2021

A couple done and possibly finished.

The black paper Kerfe gave me is inspiring me. It also holds a lot of paint and almost feels like canvas. Kerfe sent the link and I will be ordering more of this.

Hoping for a good week for everyone.

Weekend work/1/11/2021

Posting these two together: I can never leave well enough alone. Started to mark it up and apparently couldn’t stop. My husband said it looked like a psychedelic Parcheesi board. (In case you’re too young to remember Parcheesi, “Jump it’s fun, jump it’s easy, jump it’s fun to play Parcheesi”. Simpler times.

I really love the black paper that Kerfe gave me. I need to find out where she got it.

It’s a gray and chilly day here but I feel healthy (and partly vaccinated against COVID-19) which makes me feel hopeful. Have a good week, everyone!