Tag Archive | constellations

Phoenix

phoenix s

The Phoenix is appropriate to the end of this week of constellation art and haiku.  My life is very unsettled now, and I am really having a hard time focusing, so I’m not sure how and what kind of work I’ll be doing.

phoenix close up s

But the unknown always has seeds waiting to be scattered on the wind.  Fire destroys, but opens a space for something else to fill.

You can read the words for the Phoenix constellation at Pure Haiku, here.  Thanks again Freya–this was indeed a healing process for me, much needed.

Pegasus

pegasus s

This one was like a dream.  Don’t we all want to fly among the stars?

pegasus close up s

You can see the words that inspired this image at Pure Haiku, here.

Corvus

corvus s

Like the cry of a crow in the morning, the stars of the constellation Corvus leave plenty of space to fill in with the magic of imagination’s wings.

corvus close up s

You can read the words to accompany this image at Pure Haiku, here.

Centaurus

cnetaurus b s

This image is a monoprint taken from the background painting I did for one of the other celestial haikus, done over some images from something else (I can’t remember what–I often take leftover paint and drip or press it onto paper, thinking I can use it for something, somehow, later)  As I did for Andromeda, I embroidered the constellation on top.

centaurus close up s

You can find the haiku for this image at Pure Haiku, here.

Andromeda

andromeda s

I was honored when Freya at Pure Haiku chose me to be the featured writer for the Celestial Bodies theme.  It turned out to be a double blessing, as it gave me something tangible to do creatively when a member of my family became ill.  He is doing well, but I’m sure most people know the drill with cancer–surgery, and then weeks of radiation and chemo, to be followed by testing and more interventions as needed.

I want to thank everyone for their good wishes, and will try to visit your blogs when I can.  Nina and I both hope to be more present in the coming months.

andromeda close up s

You can find the haiku to go with the illustration above here.  Thanks again Freya!

Follow the Drinking Gourd

drinking-gourd-s

If the Devil calls,
sing powerful thoughts: a love
that composes hope.

Inscribe celestial paths,
showing the way to freedom.

For Black History Month, the Borough President’s office is hosting an exhibit of quilts by members of the New York Quilters of Color Network.  Some of the quilts incorporate patterns used as codes for travelers on the Underground Railroad.  Seeing the North Star pattern reminded me of the song “Follow the Drinking Gourd”–the drinking gourd being the dipper, home of Polaris, the North Star.

north-star-close-up-s

The North Star here is surrounded by another coded quilt pattern, the Wagon Wheel.  The words are from the secret keeper and Colleen’s tanka challenge this week.

The Fifth Fact
By Sarah Browning

For Ben’s project he must research five facts
about his African-American hero and write them
on posterboard. He chooses Harriet Tubman,
whose five facts are: Her father’s name was Ben.
Her mother’s name was Old Rit. She was born
in 1820 and died in 1913. She was born in Maryland
and died in New York. Ben asks for advice
about his fifth fact and I suggest: She led more than
300 people to freedom. Ben sighs the way he does
now and says, Everyone knows that, Mom.
You can read the rest of Sarah Browning’s wonderful poem here.
If only, Ben.  If only everyone knew their history.

Drawing Constellations

drawing-constellations-s

Drawing constellations in skies of dream,
landscaped as colors growing wild, extreme,
pulsing surrounding vibrations unseen,
in star-gathered moonlight, whispering beam
unconscious, unlimited, in between

Continuing my recent star theme…I actually did this awhile ago, but I’ve been tweaking the poem on and off.  This is for Jane Dougherty’s last poetry challenge posted back in the end of September.  The poetic form was her own invention:  a single stanza of five lines of ten syllables each, and the five end of line words all rhyme.   Here’s the artwork she provided:

File:Constellations1.jpg

I miss Jane’s prompts.

Cygnus

 

cygnus-collage-s2crossing north
on the road of souls
healing moon
reflects a
golden swan dreaming music
in between the stars

Many Native American tribes consider the Milky Way to be the pathway where souls travel to the spirit world.  The Northern Cross, part of the constellation Cygnus, points towards the Milky Way.

swan river

Sue Vincent’s luminous and mysterious photo prompt this week gave me another reason to consider the stars.

Swans are symbols of transformation.  They have been seen as forms of souls, messengers between worlds that accompany souls on their journey, or even shape-shifted angels.  “Swan song” is not just a random expression–it comes from the belief that swans sing a beautiful song whenever someone dies.

cygnus-close-up-s

Poem in Your Pocket Day

Big and blue s

Moon and stars, big and blue the sky–
sleep coming, sleep is coming soon–
wings drift close, shadowing the light.
I wish for wings so I could fly–
touch the stars, touch the shining moon–
map the sky by scattering dreams,
catching the stars to say good night,
sky covered with magic moon beams.

The elementary school my daughters attended celebrated National Poetry Month in a big way.  The children read and wrote a lot of verse, and Poem in Your Pocket Day was always fun, as they would pull out favorites to read to their classmates.  Last year in April I posted a few of the bookmarks the school made one year with poems and artwork from the students.  Both poem and artwork above were inspired by the bookmark below.

midnight bookmark

I love the images both Kenisha and Keanu used to represent the dreamworld of the night.  Both would be in their early 20s now; I hope they are still writing and drawing their worlds.  And producing poems from their pockets!

hand and moon s

My poem is in the form of a san san, the challenge by Jane Dougherty this week.  NaPoWriMo used this form for a prompt too, and I’ve wanted to try it, so thanks Jane for the push!

poetry month