Tag Archive | endangered species

Draw a Bird Day: Golden Winged Warbler

golden warbler 2s

tiny wanderer–
shrinking woodlands, flash of gold–
following your voice

The golden winged warbler is a tiny (5″) bird that is among the most endangered on a long list of endangered birds.  The population has been reduced by 2/3 in the last 50 years, mostly due to habitat loss in both breeding grounds (the largest population breeds in Michigan) and wintering habitat (in Central and South America–a long migration away).  They are shy, but vocal.

Once again, Draw a Bird Day, the 8th of each month, is serving as a placeholder here at MeMadTwo while Nina takes an extended break.  Come back soon Nina!

In the meantime, you can find me (Kerfe) at https://kblog.blog/.

 

Draw-a-Bird Day: short crested coquette

short crested coquette paint s

hummingbird magnetic

I consulted with the Oracle about this tiny (3″) Mexican hummingbird, one of many of the endangered bird species of the world.  Less than 1000 are estimated to exist.

short crested coquette pencil s

I did my first sketch, above, in colored pencil, but felt the colors lacked enough vibrancy, so I painted the top one with my metallic watercolors.

Flowers grow feathered
wings humming bird poetry
air breathes spiritsong

 

Draw a Bird Day: sheltered by shadows

mountain toucan s

jeweled feathers caught
in reflected mist—cloistered
chiaroscuro

This is another brightly colored resident of the South American cloud forest, the grey-breasted mountain toucan.  As with all inhabitants of the world’s cloud forests, they are a threatened species because of habitat loss.

mountain toucan close up s

Drawn with neocolors.

 

Cloud Forest (Draw a Bird Day)

el oro 2s

Outside the visible, the veil persists, a misted crown,
a canopy to shelter woodlands from both up and down–
the spirits dance their circles through the portals of the clouds,
beyond enclosure following the songs of the unknown.

With wings of color bearing light and magic on the air,
the alchemy of green and gold renews and then repairs
this ancient symbiosis moored to currents at its core
awakening new seeds, building a bridge from here to there.

The El Oro Parakeet is an endangered bird living in the Andes cloud forest of Southwestern Ecuador.  Cloud forests are also endangered throughout the world.  You can read about them here.

el oro head s

This is my first attempt at a rubaiyat poem, the featured form at dVerse for February.  I could not make 13 syllables work, so I ended up with 14.  I also fudged the rhymes a bit.  I don’t usually write long lines, and that was what I found to be the biggest challenge for me.

 

Draw a Bird Day: Pinto’s Spinetail

pinto spinetail s

listen magnetic

Pinto’s Spinetail is an endangered bird that hives in subtropical forest and shrubland in NE Brazil.  Just 2% of native forest remains in this area, and less than 1000 of these birds are currently surviving.  They mate for life, and my favorite fact about them is that “pairs sing in duets to defend their nesting territories”, according to abcbirds.org.

see the forest
as quiet as
no air

listen

song has wandered
away

pinto spinetail close up s

This painting is an experiment for me–I’ve been inspired by how Claudia McGill takes the world and simplifies it into color and shape, and this is my first attempt to imitate her approach.  Although she likes to use her paints straight out of the tube, I have to admit I mixed the bird feather color, not having a tube of gouache even close to the right tone.  It felt like painting in layers, and I do like layering.  Although I have a long way to go to reach Claudia’s grasp of the essential shapes of things…

And the Oracle was insightful, as always.

On my way to the beach (although the forecast is for a rainy week).  Nina has promised to keep you entertained while I’m away.

 

Parrot (Draw a Bird Day)

parrot-s

Parroting

Language becoming
noise words without meaning
footnotes to the air

Answers taken given
traded for babble

Particles of lies shared
on repeat screeching
chaos manifested

I meant to write a quadrille (44 words) with the secret keeper’s words this week, but I wasn’t paying attention really, and the “6-5-6-5-6-5-6-5” I wrote down beside each line became syllables instead of words.  I also meant it to be more about the birds. I used all the words though!

Now to the subject at hand:  The parrot is painted with the new gouache I got for Christmas.  I wanted to do something bright and colorful to start, and a parrot seemed the perfect subject.

Parrots are symbolically associated with voices, words, communication, and the power of truth.  They do not keep secrets.  They are also linked to color magic.  And, like many birds, they serve as messengers between heaven and earth.

They are also endangered, due to habitat loss and the pet trade.  These intelligent sub-tropical birds can live 80-100 years; a pet parrot is a lifetime investment, requiring enormous amounts of attention, care, and intellectual stimulation to thrive.  Needless to say, both birds and humans are better served by leaving these social animals in their natural habitats, and protecting those habitats.

Haiku and Bat

embroidered bat s

from inside the earth
rebirth  transitioning  death
answers with echoes

It’s Bat Appreciation Day…a reminder of how vital they are to ecosystems everywhere.  Insect control, pollination, and seed dispersal are all important ways that bats help keep the earth in balance.  Many bat populations are endangered for the usual reasons:  habitat loss and fragmentation, hunting, disease, use of chemicals.

embroidered bat close up s

Bats play an important part in story and myth as well.  Because they often live in caves and come out at dusk, bats are associated with the ambiguity of night.  Western culture tends to give bats an evil shading (think vampires and the wings of devils), but many Asian and Native American cultures associate them with good luck.

Today also marks the celebration of Haiku Poetry Day.  How do I know this?  Charlie at Doodlewash is sponsoring a month of celebratory days, and he made sure I knew about Haiku Poetry Day for NaPoWriMo.

You can see previous bat posts here and here.
And learn more about bats and bat conservation efforts here.

poetry month

More Turtles (or are they tortoises?)

sea turtle s

I’ve painted sea turtles before, when I was doing endangered species on a regular basis.  It bears repeating that nearly all sea turtles are endangered.  Habitat destruction, particularly of coastal nesting sites, and poaching for eggs, meat, skin and shells all contribute to species loss, but one of the biggest problems is that they get caught in fishing nets.  To save sea turtles and the ocean ecosystem they are part of will require global cooperation.

box turtle s

Turtles generally spend most of their time in water, while tortoises reside on land, so why are box turtles not called box tortoises?  Sometimes they are, in fact, but they actually belong to the pond turtle family, so the turtle label is also appropriate.  They are the state reptiles of North Carolina, Tennessee, Missouri, and Kansas.  Populations are declining everywhere due to (surprise!) habitat destruction and fragmentation, but they are particularly endangered in Asia, due to their use in traditional medicine, and the pet trade.

And terrapins?  They tend to live in swampy areas, equally at home in water and on land.

Nina and I have done a number of turtle posts.  With more coming, I’m sure.

You can read more about endangered turtles here.

Crowned Lemur

crowned lemur s

I haven’t had the watercolors out for awhile, and this little guy caught my eye.

Lemurs are found only on Madagascar.  All lemur species are endangered due to shrinking and fragmented habitat.  They are also poached, even from reserves, for food, and kept as pets.  Seventeen species of lemur are already extinct.

The ring-tailed lemur was featured in a previous endangered species post.

For more information about efforts to save these primates:  http://lemur.duke.edu/

Another Earth Mandala

could disappear s

…with hopes for something positive from the climate conference in Paris…

Mother:
we call you that
sometimes.  We do not think
what this could mean.  We do not think
this blue
green brown riot of pattern and
color could disappear.
We do not think:
homeless.

A response to Jane Dougherty’s “butterfly cinquain” challenge.  She’s right, it does look like a butterfly!